• Dana Webster

2020, I Bid You Adieu

Updated: Jan 4

It's the end of a weird, weird year.


I'm no Pollyanna. In fact, I've often found myself wallowing in the darkness that was so prevalent last year. But I do like to look at things from all sides (Libra, anyone?). I had at first created a list of personal pros and cons about 2020 but that didn't feel quite right to share. I have nothing new to offer and I'm a little sick of the navel gazing this past year has inflicted on me.


Have you watched the movie Groundhog Day? I can't really recommend it as high art but the premise is feeling eerily real these days. Every morning, Paul and I wake up to the exact same day as the one before. In fact, I don't even know what day it is most of the time. It's only January. Spring feels like a long, long way away.


I think it's safe to say I am bored and irritated. Maybe I should take a page out of Ontario Finance Minister Rod Phillips' playbook - only in reverse. Instead of breaking all the pandemic rules and jetting off to one of the most expensive vacation locations in the world and lying about it, I'll stay home, fire up the internet, and soak in all the photos I can of beaches, resorts, and room service. The big screen in my Tesla has a crackling fire app and video games. I could hang out there for awhile, I guess, just to get out of the house.


I can hear the disdain in the voices of all of you with young children and/or teens at home - "You're bored?? Really?" The grass is always greener, isn't it? Some of us are going mad isolating with youngsters; some of us are going mad isolating alone.



Ruby, Sadie, Chloe, Sable doing their thang!

You know who's not going mad? Cats. Cats are either sleeping, playing, eating, or grooming. And this seems to sustain them.


You know how sometimes you laugh so hard, you cry? Does it work the other way around? If I start to cry out all the grief and fear and anxiety that has built up over the past year, will it eventually turn to laughter? It feels risky to open that flood gate, either way.


It definitely feels like I am waiting for the point. What the heck was 2020 all about because, surely, there is some meaning to find there? I don't mean just on an individual basis but globally, collectively. The slogan, trite but apt, "We are all in this together" seemed to me a plea as opposed to a stated reality. Imagine Earth as a Magic 8-ball. Now imagine the Universe shaking it vigorously, whilst asking the question "Was there a point to 2020?" until the inner message reveals itself in that hazy floating window. Here are your answer options:


It's a crap shoot, to be sure. Depends a lot on who you and your circumstances are. For me, it's still too early to discern. I can't see the point with crystal clear certainty. I do know that the shake up was epic. And now we wait for the dust to settle, see where we're at. What do we keep. What do we discard. What had forward momentum that will continue through this year?


I'd like to cap off this post with wise words from intuitive guide, Heather Warren. Her words speak so eloquently to the overarching, big picture meaning behind the upheaval of last year (I love saying that now). If you like this tidbit, check out her latest podcast - a brave and compassionate viewpoint from the soul perspective.


Happy New Year whatever it may be!


 

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Nestled in the hills of Hockley Valley, Mono, Ontario, Canada